Maine Electric Rates

main electric rates Maine Electric Rates

Maine Electric Rates Information

Residential and Commercial businesses located in Maine now have the Power to Choose who their business electricity provider is.

Now that Maine is deregulated, it has never been easier to switch providers and start incurring savings on Maine electric rates.  Best Price Electricity is here to help you save time, money, and have peace of mind. We procure energy every day, and have the inside track that most consumers would not be able to get directly.  We understand that no two companies are alike, and that each deregulated area is different.  Our procurement process starts with making sure we get all the details about your business electricity costs so that we can build a product based on your company’s energy needs, budget constraints, and your energy usage and demand profile.

Getting the most competitive Maine Electric Rates has never been easier

Discount Electricity in Maine

 What Best Price Electricity can do for you in Maine:

  • We provide our energy procurement service to you at no cost
  • We help you craft the best electricity contract terms and conditions which will maximize your savings and give you more flexibility and budget certainty
  • We evaluate the available Maine Retail Electricity Providers, determine which best suits your individual needs, and negotiate the best electricity price and contract terms for your business.
  • Save time and money by outsourcing energy procurement task.
  • Quickly transition you from higher priced standard offer to lowest cost electricity provider in the Maine area.

The Best Price Electricity Procurement Strategy:

  • Obtain and analyze previous 12-months historical energy usage data to define individual load shape
  • Determine beneficial energy products and contract terms meeting the needs of your business while maximizing both short & long term cost-savings opportunities
  • Manage simultaneous negotiations with multiple energy suppliers – customers focus on their business’ needs
  • Provide unbiased approach in comparison of energy bids and contract structures
  • Execute time-sensitive contracts, followed by ongoing account management, industry alerts, and market updates.



History of Energy Deregulation in Maine

History of Deregulation in Maine:

12/02: The Maine Public Utilities Commission (PUC) released a report, Standard Offer Study and Recommendation Regarding Service after March 1, 2005, to the state Legislature. In the report, the PUC recommended standard offer service remain available after March 1, 2005, under certain conditions. For medium and large nonresidential customers, standard offer service will be continued only as a “last resort” service. In the small commercial and residential sectors, where competitive retail markets for electricity are not as fully developed as the large customer sectors, current standard offer service will continue to be offered to customers who do not choose an alternative energy supplier. Based on public interest, the PUC also recommended a “green” supply option for residential and small commercial customers.

3/02: New standard offer rates for customers in the Central Main Power Company, Bangor Hydro Electric Company, and Maine Public Service Company service territories went into effect on March 1, 2002. According to a PUC press release, medium and large commercial and industrial CMP and Bangor Hydro customers “will see the largest overall price decreases.”

9/00: Statistics from the Maine Public Service Commission (PSC) show that 26 percent of all electricity delivered by the State’s three major utilities is being purchased from alternative suppliers. However, industrial customers are purchasing the bulk of that load. In contrast, 6 percent of residential and small commercial customers have switched providers, bringing the total number of residential and small commercial customers served by competitive providers to about 1,500 customers.

5/97: LD1804 was enacted. The law will allow retail competition by March 2000 and, for large investor-owned utilities, features a market share cap of 33 percent in old service areas, a requirement for divestiture of generation assets by March 2000, and the nation’s most aggressive renewables portfolio, requiring 30 percent of generation to be from renewable energy sources (including hydroelectric).